Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010

1. Person: Macunovich, Diane J.
Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 2011
Serien: IZA Discussion Papers
Online Zugang: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/51890/1/670524999.pdf
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title
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
spellingShingle
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
Macunovich, Diane J.
IZA Discussion Papers
title_short
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
title_full
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
title_fullStr
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
title_full_unstemmed
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
title_sort
Relative cohort size, relative income, and women's labor force participation 1968 - 2010
format
electronic Article
format_phy_str_mv
Paper
publisher
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
publishDate
2011
language
English
author
Macunovich, Diane J.
description
Relative cohort size - the ratio of young to prime-age adults - and relative income - the income of young adults relative to their material aspirations, as instrumented using the income of older families their parents' age - have experienced dramatic changes over the past 40 years. Relative cohort size has been shown to cause a decline in men's relative wages - the wages of young relative to prime-age workers - due to imperfect substitutability, and the results here show that this applies perhaps even more strongly to women's relative - and absolute - starting wage. Relative cohort size first declined by 30% and then increased by 47%. Results here show that those changes explain about 60% of the declines in women's starting wage - both relative and absolute - in the first period, and 100% of its increase in the second. Relative income is hypothesized to affect a number of demographic choices by young adults, including marriage, fertility and female labor force participation, as young people strive to achieve their desired standard of living. Older family income - the denominator in a relative income variable - increased by 58.6% between 1968 and 2000, and then declined by 9%. Its changes explain 66% of the increase in the labor force participation of women in their first five years out of school between 1968 and 2000, and 75% of its decline thereafter. The study makes use of individual-level measures of labor force participation, with instrumented wages, and employs the lagged income of older families in a woman's year-state-race-education group to instrument parental income and hence material aspirations.
url
https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/51890/1/670524999.pdf
series
IZA Discussion Papers
seriesStr
IZA Discussion Papers
IZA Discussion Papers
series2
IZA Discussion Papers
series2_facet
IZA Discussion Papers
up_date
2019-12-07T03:54:24.564Z
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