Lethal and Nonlethal Anthropogenic Effects on Spotted Hyenas in the Masai Mara National Reserve

We evaluated long-term patterns of human-caused mortality among free-living spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in a Kenyan game reserve and also assessed nonlethal anthropogenic effects on hyena behavior. We monitored naturally occurring vigilance in 2 clans of hyenas, 1 disturbed and the other undist... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Pangle, Wiline M.
Weitere Personen: Holekamp, Kay E. verfasserin
Quelle: in Journal of mammalogy : JOM Vol. 91, No. 1 (2010), p. 154-164
Weitere Artikel
Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: 2010
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
Schlagworte: research-article
antipredator behavior
Crocuta crocuta
East Africa
human disturbance
livestock
tourism
vigilance
Online Zugang: Volltext
Volltext
Tags: Hinzufügen
Keine Tags. Fügen Sie den ersten Tag hinzu!
Anmerkung: Copyright: Copyright 2010 American Society of Mammalogists
LEADER 02960nma a2200373 c 4500
001 JST049732137
003 DE-601
005 20180529125244.0
007 cr uuu---uuuuu
008 150324s2010 000 0 eng d
024 8 |a 27755182 
024 8 |a 10.1644/08-MAMM-A-359R.1 
035 |a 27755182 
040 |b ger  |c GBVCP 
041 0 |a eng 
100 1 |a Pangle, Wiline M. 
245 1 0 |a Lethal and Nonlethal Anthropogenic Effects on Spotted Hyenas in the Masai Mara National Reserve  |h Elektronische Ressource 
300 |a Online-Ressource 
500 |a Copyright: Copyright 2010 American Society of Mammalogists 
520 |a We evaluated long-term patterns of human-caused mortality among free-living spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in a Kenyan game reserve and also assessed nonlethal anthropogenic effects on hyena behavior. We monitored naturally occurring vigilance in 2 clans of hyenas, 1 disturbed and the other undisturbed. The disturbed clan, living on the edge of the reserve, experienced much human disturbance from both tour vehicles and livestock grazing, whereas the undisturbed clan, living in the center of the reserve, also experienced tour vehicles but no livestock grazing. The proportion of all deaths with known causes that could be attributed to humans increased between 1988 and 2006 in the disturbed population; humans caused no mortality in the undisturbed population. Disturbed hyenas were more than twice as vigilant when resting, and they nursed their young closer to bushes, than undisturbed hyenas. Disturbed hyenas also were most vigilant on days when livestock were present in their territory, but we observed no effects of tourism on hyena vigilance. We next conducted playback experiments in which we used cowbells as treatment sounds and church bells as control sounds to determine whether hyenas from the 2 clans responded differently. After hearing cowbells, disturbed hyenas increased their vigilance more than did undisturbed hyenas. However, disturbed hyenas also increased their vigilance after hearing church bells, suggesting that disturbed hyenas may exhibit heightened responsiveness to a wide array of anthropogenic sound stimuli. Our findings suggest that human activities related to pastoralism are having measurable effects on hyena mortality, and that hyenas appear to be responding to this threat by modifying their behavior. 
653 |a research-article 
653 |a antipredator behavior 
653 |a Crocuta crocuta 
653 |a East Africa 
653 |a human disturbance 
653 |a livestock 
653 |a tourism 
653 |a vigilance 
700 1 |a Holekamp, Kay E.  |e verfasserin  |4 aut 
773 0 8 |i in  |t Journal of mammalogy : JOM  |d Oxford : Oxford Univ. Press  |g Vol. 91, No. 1 (2010), p. 154-164  |q 91:1<154-164  |w (DE-601)JST049627384  |x 1545-1542 
856 4 1 |u https://www.jstor.org/stable/27755182  |3 Volltext 
912 |a GBV_JSTOR 
951 |a AR 
952 |d 91  |j 2010  |e 1  |h 154-164 

Ähnliche Einträge

Keine ähnlichen Titel gefunden

Privacy Notice Ask a Librarian New Acquisitions