Labor Market Consequences of State Health Insurance Regulation

This study, based mainly on the 1989-98 March Current Population surveys, finds that state-mandated health insurance benefits and small-group health insurance reform had no statistically significant effects on labor market outcomes such as the quantity of work, wages, and whether an employee worked ... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Kaestner, Robert
Weitere Personen: Simon, Kosali Ilayperuma verfasserin
Quelle: in ILR review : a publication of the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, a statutory college of the State University, Cornell University, Ithaca Vol. 56, No. 1 (2002), p. 136-159
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Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: 2002
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
Schlagworte: research-article
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Anmerkung: Copyright: Copyright 2002 Cornell University
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520 |a This study, based mainly on the 1989-98 March Current Population surveys, finds that state-mandated health insurance benefits and small-group health insurance reform had no statistically significant effects on labor market outcomes such as the quantity of work, wages, and whether an employee worked for a small or large firm. The number and type of state-mandated health insurance benefits were unrelated to weeks of work, wages, and the prevalence of private insurance coverage, but positively associated with weekly work hours. Extensive small-group health insurance reform was associated with a slight decline in the prevalence of private insurance coverage in small firms, and this reform affected both full- and part-time employees. Less extensive reforms were not generally related to the prevalence of private insurance coverage. Overall, the authors do not find strong evidence that insurance regulations affected labor market outcomes, although they appear to cause a small decrease in private coverage. 
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