Dispersal in the Communally Breeding Groove-Billed Ani (Crotophaga sulcirostris)

We studied dispersal in a color-banded population of the Groove-billed Ani (Crotophaga sulcirostris) in Costa Rica. Eight percent of the young alive at the end of the breeding season bred on their natal territories the next year and 4% remained but did not breed. Thirteen percent dispersed successfu... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Bowen, Bonnie S.
Weitere Personen: Koford, Rolf R. verfasserin; Vehrencamp, Sandra L. verfasserin
Quelle: in The condor : ornithological applications Vol. 91, No. 1 (1989), p. 52-64
Weitere Artikel
Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: 1989
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
Schlagworte: research-article
Groove-billed Ani
Crotophaga sulcirostris
Cuculidae
Costa Rica
Communal breeding
Cooperative breeding
Joint nesting
Dispersal
Philopatry
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Anmerkung: Copyright: Copyright 1989 The Cooper Ornithological Society
Zusammenfassung: We studied dispersal in a color-banded population of the Groove-billed Ani (Crotophaga sulcirostris) in Costa Rica. Eight percent of the young alive at the end of the breeding season bred on their natal territories the next year and 4% remained but did not breed. Thirteen percent dispersed successfully within the study area and bred in communal groups or simple pairs. The remaining 75% of the young birds disappeared from the study area. Young males remained in the study area as breeders more frequently than did young females. Breeding dispersal occurred, with at least 9% of the adult population moving to a new territory each year. We used a demographic model to estimate the following dispersal fates for young birds. For both males and females, 62% of the young alive at the end of the breeding season in which they hatched obtained a breeding position the next year. Of those that dispersed from their natal territories, 59 to 70% of the males and 64 to 74% of the females obtained breeding positions. Of those that bred the year after they hatched, 22% of the males and 2% of the females bred in their natal units, 34% of the males and 6% of the females bred within the study area but outside their natal units, and 44% of the males and 92% of the females bred outside the study area. We estimated that all of the males and 28% of the females that bred the year after they hatched were within three territories of their natal sites.
ISSN: 1938-5129

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