Male Preference for Large Females and Assortative Mating for Body Size in the Sand Lizard (Lacerta agilis)

Male sand lizards (Lacerta agilis) are polygynous and guard individual females for several hours to days after copulation. Even though the copulation itself only lasts 2-4 min, the total time that a male invests per female is considerably more and may constitute a substantial investment during a mat... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Olsson, Mats
Quelle: in Behavioral ecology and sociobiology Vol. 32, No. 5 (1993), p. 337-341
Weitere Artikel
Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: 1993
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
Schlagworte: research-article
Online Zugang: Volltext
Volltext
Tags: Hinzufügen
Keine Tags. Fügen Sie den ersten Tag hinzu!
Anmerkung: Copyright: Copyright 1993 Springer-Verlag
LEADER 02261nma a2200265 c 4500
001 JST012372404
003 DE-601
005 20180603135006.0
007 cr uuu---uuuuu
008 150323s1993 000 0 eng d
024 8 |a 4600824 
035 |a 4600824 
040 |b ger  |c GBVCP 
041 0 |a eng 
100 1 |a Olsson, Mats 
245 1 0 |a Male Preference for Large Females and Assortative Mating for Body Size in the Sand Lizard (Lacerta agilis)  |h Elektronische Ressource 
300 |a Online-Ressource 
500 |a Copyright: Copyright 1993 Springer-Verlag 
520 |a Male sand lizards (Lacerta agilis) are polygynous and guard individual females for several hours to days after copulation. Even though the copulation itself only lasts 2-4 min, the total time that a male invests per female is considerably more and may constitute a substantial investment during a mating season. In such situations, when male copulation frequency is constrained, or when variation in female fecundity is high, mate choice by males may be adaptive. Large body size in female sand lizards is correlated with higher fecundity. In choice experiments performed in the laboratory, male sand lizards preferred to court large females rather than small females. In addition, when there was little difference in size between the females in the experiment, the males visited the two females more often before they started to court the preferred female. The results from a field study during 1984 and 1987-1990 showed that females are non-aggressive; have small neighboring home ranges (c. 100 m2) and may share burrows and sites for thermoregulation. This means that females can be found close together and thus gives males the opportunity to choose a mate. Assortative mating with respect to size was observed in a natural population, as well as a limited number of direct choices of females by males. These results support the results of the choice experiment. 
653 |a research-article 
773 0 8 |i in  |t Behavioral ecology and sociobiology  |d Berlin : Springer  |g Vol. 32, No. 5 (1993), p. 337-341  |q 32:5<337-341  |w (DE-601)JST012329789  |x 1432-0762 
856 4 1 |u https://www.jstor.org/stable/4600824  |3 Volltext 
912 |a GBV_JSTOR 
951 |a AR 
952 |d 32  |j 1993  |e 5  |h 337-341 

Ähnliche Einträge

Keine ähnlichen Titel gefunden

Privacy Notice Ask a Librarian New Acquisitions