Public Policy toward Nongovernmental Organizations in Developing Countries

July 2001 - If a developing country government is not good at providing public services such as health care, education, and social protection, would NGOs be better at doing so? What advantages do NGOs have over for-profit providers of publicly funded services? And considering the importance of donor... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Jack
Format: E-Buch
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: Washington, D.C The World Bank 2001, 2001
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource (1 online resource (32 p.))
Schlagworte: Bank
Civil Society
Debt Markets
Economic Theory and Research
Education
Finance and Financial Sector Development
Financial Literacy
Governance
Government
Income
Intervention
Labor Policies
Learning
Macroeconomics and Economic Growth
Microfinance
NGO
Organizations
Outcomes
Participation
Policies
Policy
Poverty
Poverty Alleviation
Poverty Monitoring and Analysis
Poverty Reduction
Programs
Public Sector Corruption and Anticorruption Measures
Social Development
Social Protections and Labor
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653 |a Poverty Alleviation 
653 |a Poverty Monitoring and Analysis 
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653 |a Programs 
653 |a Public Sector Corruption and Anticorruption Measures 
653 |a Social Development 
653 |a Social Protections and Labor 
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520 |a July 2001 - If a developing country government is not good at providing public services such as health care, education, and social protection, would NGOs be better at doing so? What advantages do NGOs have over for-profit providers of publicly funded services? And considering the importance of donor funding, which is better for delivering such services, an international NGO or a grassroots NGO? Jack presents two descriptive models of nongovernmental organizations and poses normative questions about public policy toward NGOs. In situations in which optimal government intervention in a distorted or inequitable economy employs an NGO-like body, he considers which kinds of NGO might be used. First, in many developing countries NGOs participate in the delivery of what are essentially private goods—in particular, health care and education. In an economy without NGOs, there may be good redistributive and efficiency reasons for the government to provide these goods in kind.  
520 |a But if direct government provision of such services is ineffective or inefficient, when is contracting out to an NGO-like institution preferable to using a traditional for-profit firm? (Another way to frame this is to ask: What is the optimal taxation and regulation of private providers of publicly financed services?) NGOs also provide useful real and financial links with external donors. They are used to provide services the government favors and donors are willing to fund. In this model, the service provider is chosen to yield the best outcome for both government and donor. In this context, Jack compares an international NGO and a grassroots organization. It may be more efficient to transfer donor funds through an international NGO than through a local NGO, but when donor-government cooperation fails, a project implemented by an international NGO is effectively killed.  
520 |a If a project implemented by a local organization can limp along, this otherwise less efficient organization might be preferred. This paper—a product of Public Service Delivery, Development Research Group—is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the role of NGOs in delivering basic public services. The author may be contacted at wgj@georgetown.edu 

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