HPV AND CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION

Background: The causal role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in all cancers of the uterine cervix has been firmly established biologically and epidemiologically. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70 % of the cases worldwide. HPV has been recognized as a necessary cause of cervical cancer, meaning ... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Marjetka Uršič-Vrščaj verfasserin
Weitere Personen: Milan Bašković verfasserin; Sonja Bebar verfasserin; Astrid Djurišić verfasserin; Vida Stržinar verfasserin; Aleš Vakselj verfasserin
Quelle: In Zdravniški Vestnik (01.02.2018)
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Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Slovenian
Veröffentlicht: 2018
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
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  Creative Commons License Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
Zusammenfassung: Background: The causal role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in all cancers of the uterine cervix has been firmly established biologically and epidemiologically. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70 % of the cases worldwide. HPV has been recognized as a necessary cause of cervical cancer, meaning that in the absence of the persistent presence of HPV DNA in the cervical cells, cervical cancer will not occur. Thus preventive strategies based on HPV testing in screening programmes or HPV type-specific vaccination are based on solid ground. Most cancers of the vagina and anus are likewise caused by HPV 16, as are a siteable fraction of cancers of the vulva, the penis and the oropharynx. Cervical cancer screening can be a highly effective secondary intervention. In the developing countries these programmes are either not available or are ineffective. HPV vaccination represents the most effective intervention in that scenario. Prophylactic vaccination with human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VPL) vaccines against HPV 16 and HPV 18, has transformed our prospects for reducing the in- cidence of cervical cancer on global scale. HPV vaccines are immunogenic, well tolerated and show remarkable efficacy. Screening will have to continue, as two of the 15 oncogenic HPV types are in the vaccines and for two to three decades at least unvaccinated sexually active women still remain at risk for the disease. Conclusions: If vaccination, screening and HPV testing are combined then the virtual elimination of cervical cancer is possible.
ISSN: 1318-0347

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