Epidemiologic Transition in Australia – the last hundred years

Mortality change in Australia since 1907 is analysed in the light of Epidemiologic Transition theory. Trends in life expectancy by sex and the sex difference, are examined at ages 0, 50, 65 and 85 years. Trends in mortality by major cause of death are broadly related to the stages of the Epidemiolog... Ausführliche Beschreibung

1. Person: Heather Booth verfasserin
Quelle: In Canadian Studies in Population (01.05.2016)
Weitere Artikel
Format: Online-Artikel
Sprache: English
Veröffentlicht: 2016
Beschreibung: Online-Ressource
Online Zugang: Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
Volltext
Tags: Hinzufügen
Keine Tags. Fügen Sie den ersten Tag hinzu!
  Creative Commons License Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
LEADER 02023nma a2200289 c 4500
001 DOAJ02190975X
003 DE-601
005 20190329231318.0
007 cr uuu---uuuuu
008 171226s2016 000 0 eng d
024 7 |a 10.25336/P6VP5J  |2 doi 
035 |a (DE-599)DOAJ40721c57b32d4adab931a42ad8497346 
040 |b ger  |c GBVCP 
041 0 |a eng 
100 0 |a Heather Booth  |e verfasserin  |4 aut 
245 1 0 |a Epidemiologic Transition in Australia – the last hundred years  |h Elektronische Ressource 
300 |a Online-Ressource 
520 |a Mortality change in Australia since 1907 is analysed in the light of Epidemiologic Transition theory. Trends in life expectancy by sex and the sex difference, are examined at ages 0, 50, 65 and 85 years. Trends in mortality by major cause of death are broadly related to the stages of the Epidemiologic Transition, and a decomposition of changes in life expectancy by age and cause of death is used to further elaborate on the progression through three stages, the Age of Receding Pandemics, the Age of Degenerative and Man-Made Diseases and the Age of Delayed Degenerative Diseases. A consideration of temporal changes in age patterns of mortality decline includes a focus on infant mortality, the accident hump and mortality at older ages. In the early decades of the twentieth century, Australia was a leader in the Epidemiologic Transition, but had lost this advantage by 1950. Differentials by state/territory, indigeneity and socio-economic factors identify the leaders and laggards in the transition. 
773 0 8 |i In  |t Canadian Studies in Population  |g  (01.05.2016)  |w (DE-601)DOAJ000079952  |x 0380-1489 
856 4 0 |u http://dx.doi.org/10.25336/P6VP5J 
856 4 0 |y DOAJ  |u https://doaj.org/article/40721c57b32d4adab931a42ad8497346 
856 4 0 |u https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/csp/index.php/csp/article/view/25702 
856 4 0 |u https://doaj.org/toc/0380-1489 
856 4 0 |u https://doaj.org/toc/1927-629X 
912 |a GBV_DOAJ 
951 |a AR 
952 |j 2016  |b 01  |c 05 

Ähnliche Einträge

Keine ähnlichen Titel gefunden

Privacy Notice Ask a Librarian New Acquisitions